sunnyskies-slimthighs:

This motivates me

sunnyskies-slimthighs:

This motivates me

(Source: goworkouttv, via therunning-yogi)

amroyounes:

Healthier Alternatives to your eating habits.

I haven’t tried all of these, so I can’t vouch.  I know for my tuna salad that I make I do a mix of olive oil and mustard instead of mayo, but I don’t know in what universe Mustart is a straight up alternative to Mayonnaise.

For Salads, Avocado and Almonds are a great way to beef up the salad without adding bread!

(via daretobemotivated)

(Source: fiti-vation, via tonedbellyplease)

So excited my fruit and veggie seedlings have started sprouting now that the warm weather is here! 14 different plants…I can’t wait to be able to eat from my garden :)

sweatsalty:

I was recently asked this question, so here are my tips:
First and foremost I think the most important thing is to learn to grocery shop. This may seem silly, but it’s very important. I have a lot of grocery lists tagged here. I generally shop the outside rim of the store (produce, dairy, frozen, meats) and stay away from the processed dry and sugary foods.
Learning to properly shop for yourself sets the stage for meal prep (the second most important thing!). Meal prep is really important for a busy schedule: if I don’t have meals prepared, I’ll end up buying bad food. 
Finding recipes and discovering new foods is also an absolute must! There’s some great recipes here.
Examples of meal prep:


You can cook steel cut oats on Sunday and eat it safely for breakfast for the next 1.5 weeks. Read this about breakfast!
You can prep sandwiches or salads or pastas the night before to bring to class.
You can cut up apples (squeeze w a little lemon juice so they don’t turn brown) the night before for snacks, too.
Prepare small bags of almonds and dark chocolate chips ready to throw in your purse.
It totally depends what you like to eat, but for me, my very quick go-to meal is a bowl of pasta. When I cook pasta, it ends up being 40% pasta, 50% veggies and 10% sauce. Cook the pasta, add in frozen veggies (usually petite peas, or spinach, or zucchini), add some sauce (sometimes tomato-based or just EVOO). Then season with kosher salt and pepper. This reheats really well if you invest in some good tupperware (I like this).


I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any questions.

sweatsalty:

I was recently asked this question, so here are my tips:
  1. First and foremost I think the most important thing is to learn to grocery shop. This may seem silly, but it’s very important. I have a lot of grocery lists tagged here. I generally shop the outside rim of the store (produce, dairy, frozen, meats) and stay away from the processed dry and sugary foods.
  2. Learning to properly shop for yourself sets the stage for meal prep (the second most important thing!). Meal prep is really important for a busy schedule: if I don’t have meals prepared, I’ll end up buying bad food. 
  3. Finding recipes and discovering new foods is also an absolute must! There’s some great recipes here.

Examples of meal prep:

  • You can cook steel cut oats on Sunday and eat it safely for breakfast for the next 1.5 weeks. Read this about breakfast!
  • You can prep sandwiches or salads or pastas the night before to bring to class.
  • You can cut up apples (squeeze w a little lemon juice so they don’t turn brown) the night before for snacks, too.
  • Prepare small bags of almonds and dark chocolate chips ready to throw in your purse.
  • It totally depends what you like to eat, but for me, my very quick go-to meal is a bowl of pasta. When I cook pasta, it ends up being 40% pasta, 50% veggies and 10% sauce. Cook the pasta, add in frozen veggies (usually petite peas, or spinach, or zucchini), add some sauce (sometimes tomato-based or just EVOO). Then season with kosher salt and pepper. This reheats really well if you invest in some good tupperware (I like this).
I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any questions.

(via tonedbellyplease)

(Source: colorun, via daretobemotivated)